Central Venous Occlusion is a
Significant Problem
in Vascular Access

THE NEED FOR IMMEDIATE
VASCULAR ACCESS

While permanent vascular access, such as an arteriovenous (AV) fistula, is the preferred access option for patients on hemodialysis therapy, these often can take 4 months or longer to mature. Since a central venous catheter (CVC) is often required during this time period, using the preferable placement location of the right internal jugular (RIJ) vein to delivery hemodialysis therapy is advantageous.

CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETERS
OFTEN LEAD TO VENOUS OCCLUSION

CVC placements are one of the most common medical procedures performed, with more than 6 million CVCs placed annually in Europe and the United States1. However, studies show that more than 40% of patients with CVCs develop a venous obstruction2, which may compromise the patient’s ability to receive therapy.

CARING FOR PATIENTS WITH VENOUS OCCLUSIVE DISEASE IS COSTLY AND INCREASES MORBIDITY

In patients with chronically occluded central veins, the current approach is to move to another vein if a subsequent CVC is needed. However, failed venous access attempts may prevent permanent AV access, increasing patient morbidity and the overall cost of care2.

COSTS OF OCCLUSION

infographic

THE NUMBER OF PATIENTS WITH VENOUS
OCCLUSION IS GROWING

As the population ages and the number of hospitalizations increase, the number of patients who require central venous access is also rising2.

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Today,
there is a solution.

REFERENCES
1. iData 2008 US Vascular Access Market Data Report.
2. Data on file at Bluegrass Vascular.